If you spend enough time reading or writing, you find a voice, but you also find certain tastes. You find certain writers who when they write, it makes your own brain voice like a tuning fork, and you just resonate with them. And when that happens, reading those writers … becomes a source of unbelievable joy. It’s like eating candy for the soul.

And I sometimes have a hard time understanding how people who don’t have that in their lives make it through the day.

If he wants to be an asshole, it’s a free country. Millions before him have made the same life choice.
vintageanchorbooks:

“Once you let people know anything about what you think, that’s it, you’re dead. Then they’ll be jumping about in your mind, taking things out, holding them up to the light and killing them, yes, killing them, because thoughts are supposed to stay and grow in quiet, dark places, like butterflies in cocoons.” ― Helen Oyeyemi, The Icarus Girl

vintageanchorbooks:

“Once you let people know anything about what you think, that’s it, you’re dead. Then they’ll be jumping about in your mind, taking things out, holding them up to the light and killing them, yes, killing them, because thoughts are supposed to stay and grow in quiet, dark places, like butterflies in cocoons.” 
― Helen OyeyemiThe Icarus Girl

Each beat of your heart is a small miracle, you know, so don’t get carried away.
The Children’s Room has gone [x] days without singing a song from Frozen or Tangled.
How strange it is. We have these deep terrible lingering fears about ourselves and the people we love. Yet we walk around, talk to people, eat and drink. We manage to function. The feelings are deep and real. Shouldn’t they paralyze us? How is it we can survive them, at least for a little while? We drive a car, we teach a class. How is it no one sees how deeply afraid we were, last night, this morning? Is it something we all hide from each other, by mutual consent? Or do we share the same secret without knowing it? Wear the same disguise?
vintageanchorbooks:

"The bitterest tears shed over graves are for words left unsaid and deeds left undone."—from Little Foxes (1865) by Harriet Beecher Stowe

vintageanchorbooks:

"The bitterest tears shed over graves are for words left unsaid and deeds left undone."
—from Little Foxes (1865) by Harriet Beecher Stowe

theparisreview:

“Do you know why teachers use me? Because I speak in tongues. I write metaphors. Every one of my stories is a metaphor you can remember. The great religions are all metaphor. We appreciate things like Daniel and the lion’s den, and the Tower of Babel. People remember these metaphors because they are so vivid you can’t get free of them and that’s what kids like in school. They read about rocket ships and encounters in space, tales of dinosaurs. All my life I’ve been running through the fields and picking up bright objects. I turn one over and say, Yeah, there’s a story.” —Ray Bradbury, born on this day in 1920

theparisreview:

“Do you know why teachers use me? Because I speak in tongues. I write metaphors. Every one of my stories is a metaphor you can remember. The great religions are all metaphor. We appreciate things like Daniel and the lion’s den, and the Tower of Babel. People remember these metaphors because they are so vivid you can’t get free of them and that’s what kids like in school. They read about rocket ships and encounters in space, tales of dinosaurs. All my life I’ve been running through the fields and picking up bright objects. I turn one over and say, Yeah, there’s a story.” —Ray Bradbury, born on this day in 1920

theparisreview:

“You have to write the way you see things. I tell people, Make a list of ten things you hate and tear them down in a short story or poem. Make a list of ten things you love and celebrate them. When I wrote Fahrenheit 451 I hated book burners and I loved libraries. So there you are.” —Ray Bradbury
Illustration from the first serialization of the novel in Playboy (March, April, and May 1954).

theparisreview:

“You have to write the way you see things. I tell people, Make a list of ten things you hate and tear them down in a short story or poem. Make a list of ten things you love and celebrate them. When I wrote Fahrenheit 451 I hated book burners and I loved libraries. So there you are.” —Ray Bradbury

Illustration from the first serialization of the novel in Playboy (March, April, and May 1954).

catagator:

These two pictures from the director of the Ferguson Public Library and the library’s instagram are also worth sharing. 

TAXONOMY

librarianproblems:

EXPECTATION:

image

REALITY:

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Submitted by Megan

The ability to read becomes devalued when what one has learned to read adds nothing of importance to one’s life.

strandbooks:

Underlined passage, Walden by Henry David Thoreau, page 85.

I don’t know about you, but I could sure use a cottage full of books.